Yahoo Think Tank explores the limits of online creativity

November 9, 2005

Yahoo Australia is sponsoring a two-week experiment in online creativity called the Yahoo! Think Tank. Rotating teams of creative people from ad agencies in Australia and New Zealand are living and working in a “transparent,” fully-functioning creative studio, complete with a desk, PC and whiteboards. Six webcams enable people from around the world to watch these creatives at work, 24/7. It’s quite interactive: You can submit creative briefs (concepts you’d like them to brainstorm on) via an online form and submit messages to be displayed on a plasma screen in their “think tank.” You can also view a gallery of previously submitted briefs and the ideas the teams came up with. The Yahoo! Think Tank will be operational through November 17th.


Yahoo, Google to launch new wireless services

November 7, 2005

Yahoo Inc. (YHOO.O: Quote, Profile, Research) and Google Inc. (GOOG.O: Quote, Profile, Research) are set to roll out new wireless services, taking advantage of advanced networks and cellphones to provide features similar to those available on computers, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday.

Yahoo soon will introduce a cellphone it will sell through a partnership with SBC Communications (SBC.N: Quote, Profile, Research) , according to SBC executives. The phone will take Yahoo a step closer to linking music, photos and email with consumers' existing online accounts, address books and preferences, the paper said.


Yahoo, Google to launch new wireless services

November 7, 2005

Yahoo Inc. (YHOO.O: Quote, Profile, Research) and Google Inc. (GOOG.O: Quote, Profile, Research) are set to roll out new wireless services, taking advantage of advanced networks and cellphones to provide features similar to those available on computers, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday.

Yahoo soon will introduce a cellphone it will sell through a partnership with SBC Communications (SBC.N: Quote, Profile, Research) , according to SBC executives. The phone will take Yahoo a step closer to linking music, photos and email with consumers’ existing online accounts, address books and preferences, the paper said.


IT links CRM, analytical tools to keep customers

November 5, 2005

Companies are increasingly looking to tie traditional CRM systems to analytical tools to retain and boost the value of customers, according to users at SAS Institute Inc.'s BetterManagement Live Worldwide Business Conference 2005 here this week.

Aegon Direct Marketing Services Inc., the Baltimore-based direct marketing arm of Aegon USA Inc., this week began a year-long rollout of SAS CRM and analytical tools that will replace four legacy CRM systems that run marketing campaigns at four locations.


Can Open Source Outdo the IPod?

November 5, 2005

Consumer electronics manufacturer Neuros Audio is tapping the open-source community to convert its upcoming portable media player from iPod road kill into a contender.

This could be a stroke of genius. Open-source Linux has taken on Microsoft's dominant Windows operating system, and Mozilla has challenged the ubiquitous Internet Explorer web browser. In the same way, open source would seem suited to breaking Apple Computer's digital music stranglehold. Open-source geeks might not represent the typical consumer, demographics-wise. But hackers don't like to waste time with a clumsy user interface.


IT links CRM, analytical tools to keep customers

November 5, 2005

Companies are increasingly looking to tie traditional CRM systems to analytical tools to retain and boost the value of customers, according to users at SAS Institute Inc.’s BetterManagement Live Worldwide Business Conference 2005 here this week.

Aegon Direct Marketing Services Inc., the Baltimore-based direct marketing arm of Aegon USA Inc., this week began a year-long rollout of SAS CRM and analytical tools that will replace four legacy CRM systems that run marketing campaigns at four locations.


Can Open Source Outdo the IPod?

November 5, 2005

Consumer electronics manufacturer Neuros Audio is tapping the open-source community to convert its upcoming portable media player from iPod road kill into a contender.

This could be a stroke of genius. Open-source Linux has taken on Microsoft’s dominant Windows operating system, and Mozilla has challenged the ubiquitous Internet Explorer web browser. In the same way, open source would seem suited to breaking Apple Computer’s digital music stranglehold. Open-source geeks might not represent the typical consumer, demographics-wise. But hackers don’t like to waste time with a clumsy user interface.