To be considered “OSI Certified” a product must !

January 23, 2006

A certification standard issued by the Open Source Initiative (OSI) that indicates that the source code of a computer program is made available free of charge to the general public.

To be considered "OSI Certified" a product must meet the following criteria:

* The author or holder of the license of the source code cannot collect royalties on the distribution of the program
* The distributed program must make the source code accessible to the user
* The author must allow modifications and derivations of the work under the program's original name
* No person, group or field of endeavor can be denied access to the program
* The rights attached to the program must not depend on the program's being part of a particular software distribution
* The licensed software cannot place restrictions on other software that is distributed with it.


Six Principles about the Innovation Process

January 20, 2006

Basic principles about the Innovation Process

1. Need Drives Innovation
2. Innovation Starts with the Customer
3. Innovation Drives Technology
4. Innovations are Interconnected
5. Stories Transfer Knowledge
6. Innovation Requires Discipline & Patience


What does open-source software must comply !

January 20, 2006

Open-source software must comply with the following criteria
1. Free Redistribution
2. Source Code
3. Derived Works
4. Integrity of The Author's Source Code
5. No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups
6. No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor
7. Distribution of License
8. License Must Not Be Specific to a Product
9. License Must Not Restrict Other Software
10. License Must Be Technology-Neutral


Definition – Open Source

January 20, 2006

Open source refers to a program in which the source code is available to the general public for use and/or modification from its original design free of charge.


Are they not free to Share Thoughts

January 18, 2006

The news that Microsoft shut down a Chinese blogger's site at the request of Beijingofficials is bringing a renewed focus on the role U.S. companies play in helping China control the Internet. The Chinese government, determined to prevent dissidents from using the Net to promote taboo subjects such as the Falun Gong religious movement, formal independence for Taiwan, or an end to Communist Party rule,So check the Chinese rules and control the content that's available for local Net surfers.


Are they not free to Share Thoughts

January 18, 2006
The news that Microsoft shut down a Chinese blogger’s site at the request of Beijing

officials is bringing a renewed focus on the role U.S. companies play in helping China control the Internet. The Chinese government, determined to prevent dissidents from using the Net to promote taboo subjects such as the Falun Gong religious movement, formal independence for Taiwan, or an end to Communist Party rule,

So check the Chinese rules and control the content that’s available for local Net surfers.

The elements of Innovation

January 10, 2006

Trust: to make people comfortable about sharing their ideas with the organization. They need to feel they can make mistakes without suffering undue consequences.

Management buy-in: Management must demonstrate their commitment to innovation through internal and external communications media. Management must also demonstrate being creative themselves; as well as a willingness to try out creative, yet risky ideas.

Budget: is necessary to implement highly creative or disruptive ideas, which by nature are more risky than less creative ideas. Money must also be found for investing for tools (see below) that facilitate idea sharing and development and training in the use of those tools.

Tools: such as an idea management tool for soliciting, capturing and evaluating ideas from the employees. Used well, an idea management tool is the best on-going tool for idea capture. Also useful are creative project teams, brainstorming sessions, mind-mapping tools and other items which facilitate creative thinking and collaboration.

Evaluation methods: are necessary for evaluating ideas generated by the tools. Many tools, such as idea management systems, include evaluation components.

Facilities: including meeting rooms, other spaces where people can meet and share ideas, white boards, post-its, pens and other things which facilitate creative meetings and brainstorming.

Rewards: Whether recognition, small gifts or granting special privileges, some kind of fair reward scheme motivates people to share their creative ideas with the organization.

Time: Employees need time to be creative.

How all of these components come together will vary from firm to firm. What is important is that these components exist, that there is flexibility.